1. If you’re in the Philadelphia area, you should check out Cindy Stockton-Moore’s exhibit Other Absences at Eastern State Penitentiary. Her exhibit contains 50 portraits of murder victims whose killers spent time in Eastern State. Creatively, it’s impressive work.I’ve seen a few of he original photos she used to create these portraits. Many of those original photos have not held up well over the years. Knowing that makes her work here even more amazing to me. But equally impressive… she didn’t just pull photos and recreate them with paint, she researched each of the people before painting them. For more info about her exhibit - ‘Eastern State Penitentiary Announces New Artist Installations for 2014'  

    If you’re in the Philadelphia area, you should check out Cindy Stockton-Moore’s exhibit Other Absences at Eastern State Penitentiary.

    Her exhibit contains 50 portraits of murder victims whose killers spent time in Eastern State. Creatively, it’s impressive work.

    I’ve seen a few of he original photos she used to create these portraits. Many of those original photos have not held up well over the years. Knowing that makes her work here even more amazing to me. But equally impressive… she didn’t just pull photos and recreate them with paint, she researched each of the people before painting them.

    For more info about her exhibit - ‘Eastern State Penitentiary Announces New Artist Installations for 2014'  

  2. HARRISBURG PATRIOT - May 21, 1921
Christopher Murrano is found guilty of killing Detective Joseph McGinn. This was the first of two trials for Murrano. Both trials would end with a guilty verdict and death sentence for Murrano 

    HARRISBURG PATRIOT - May 21, 1921

    Christopher Murrano is found guilty of killing Detective Joseph McGinn. This was the first of two trials for Murrano. Both trials would end with a guilty verdict and death sentence for Murrano 

  3. PATRICK MCGINN was born in COUNTY TYRONE IRELAND about 1838.

    He arrived in the United States in February of 1861.  The city he deported from, the ship he traveled to the U.S. on and the city he arrived in are unknown at this time.

    From February to December 1861 Patrick lived mostly on a farm in Philaelphia at Chestnut Hill and Market Streets.  For three or four months during this time he worked for the U.S. Government in Washington D.C., Maryland and Philadelphia.  It is unclear what his specific job with the Government was at this time.

    On January 30, 1862, Philadelphia, Patrick enlisted in the U.S. Navy under the alias Patrick Lowry.   Patrick lived and hung out with the Lowry family in the months leading up to his enlistment in the navy.  Two of the Lowry brothers enlisted in the navy the same day as Patrick.

    Read more
  4. MCGINN FAMILY TREE - High Level Overview

    MCGINN FAMILY TREE - High Level Overview

  5. CASE WORKED BY JOSEPH MCGINN - October 1

    SAILORS RESCUE POLICEMAN

    Jackies Drag Officer From Mob of Enraged Negroes

    Policeman Thomas J. Connelly, of the 2d and Christian streets station, who has record for bravery and achievement equaled by few policemen in this city, will probably be discharged today from the Pennsylvania Hospital, where he was taken after receiving injuries in negro riot yesterday. A crowd of negroes attacked the policeman and several arrests were made. William Derry, of 725 South 12th street, negro, was held under $600 bail for further hearing on Wednesday.

    While attempting to arrest a negress at 12th and Fitzwater streets, Connelly was set upon by crowd of negroes. The policeman is powerful man, but he was overpowered and beaten unconscious. His stick was broken. Six sailors passing by in an automobile rescued him. Lieutenant Marple, of the 2d and Christian streets station, and Detectives McGinn and Fields are investigating the case, and said several arrests will be made today

  6. BACKGROUND

    News article that first notes Anna McGinn and some kind of mental or physical illnessJoseph McGinn had eight children with his first wife Mary (Mary E. Burns). Only three of those children lived passed the age of 10. Those children were…

    • Marie: their first child, my great aunt, born in 1897, died in 1987
    • Julia: their second child, my great aunt, born in 1898, died in 1980
    • Anna Marie: their last child, my grandmother, born btw 1906-1908, died 1941

    On July 18, 1915, Joseph McGinn’s first wife Mary died (cause of her death is unknown to me at this time).

    Three years later, in July of 1918, Joseph McGinn married his second wife. Her name was Mary E. Smith.

    Joseph and his second wife Mary had one child, Andrew McGinn. Andrew was born in August of 1919.

    STORY

    The 1910 census shows Joseph McGinn living with his first wife Mary, my great aunts Marie and Julia, and my grandmother Anna. This is the last record I have that shows them living together as a complete family. For some unknown reason, it appears the family fragmented after Joseph’s first wife dies in 1915, and the 1920 census.

    The 1920 census record shows that Joseph is living with his second wife Mary, and their son Andrew at Montrose Street, but Marie, Julia and Anna do not appear on the record. Aunt Marie (22 years-old), Aunt Julia (21 years-old), and my grandmother Anna (12-14 years old) no longer live with their father in 1920. 

    Marie and Julia are unmarried at this time but they don’t live at home? For an devotedly Irish Catholic family, something is wrong here. Traditionally those two should live at home until they get married.

    After some extensive research, I found Julia and Marie in the 1920 census….they were living with their aunt (their dead mother’s sister). I expected to find Anna living with them too, but her name does not appear at this address.

    So why have Marie and Julia moved out…and more importantly, where is my 12-14 year-old grandmother.

  7. JOSEPH MCGINN’S MURDER APPEALS HIS DEATH SENTENCE - January 1923

    Christopher Murrano, twice convicted of murdering Joe McGinn, appeals his death sentence in 1923. This  appeal fails, and a few days later his execution date is set for April of this year (1923). 

    For reasons unknown to me, Pennsylvania Governor Gifford Pinchot (in office January 20, 1923 - January 27, 1927) delays Murrano’s execution a number of times throughout 1923 and early 1924. 

    And then in 1924, the Pennsylvania Parole Board pardons Murrano’s from his death sentence. From this point, I have tracked Murrano to Eastern State Penitentiary (1930 Federal Census). However, I cannot find Murrano’s name listed in Eastern State’s 1940 Federal Census record.  

  8. Joe McGinn’s WWI Draft Registration - September 20, 1918
This record shows Joe and his second wife Mary E. (nee Smith) McGinn living at 17 North St. Bernard Street. It also notes that Joe now works in the 42nd police district, and works out of the Peach & Media police station.
This is the first time Joe has lived outside of Philly’s 1st Ward. The move is curious to me at first….until I look closer and notice this address is across the street from  the Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane. 
———————————————————————————————————————————-
ABOUT THE WWI DRAFT REGISTRATION: In 1917 and 1918, approximately 24 million men living in the United States completed a World War I draft registration card. These registration cards represent approximately 98% of the men under the age of 46. The total U.S. population in 1917-1918 was about 100 million individuals. In other words, close to 25% of the total population is represented in these records.

    Joe McGinn’s WWI Draft Registration - September 20, 1918

    This record shows Joe and his second wife Mary E. (nee Smith) McGinn living at 17 North St. Bernard Street. It also notes that Joe now works in the 42nd police district, and works out of the Peach & Media police station.

    This is the first time Joe has lived outside of Philly’s 1st Ward. The move is curious to me at first….until I look closer and notice this address is across the street from  the Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane

    ———————————————————————————————————————————-

    ABOUT THE WWI DRAFT REGISTRATION: In 1917 and 1918, approximately 24 million men living in the United States completed a World War I draft registration card. These registration cards represent approximately 98% of the men under the age of 46. The total U.S. population in 1917-1918 was about 100 million individuals. In other words, close to 25% of the total population is represented in these records.

  9. First Newspaper Story About Joe McGinn’s Death October 4, 1920| Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger 
Page three, columns one and two 
Source: Library of Congress - Chronicling America Newspapers 

    First Newspaper Story About Joe McGinn’s Death 

    October 4, 1920| Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger 

    Page three, columns one and two 

    Source: Library of Congress - Chronicling America Newspapers 

  10. Images of Philadelphia from Early 1900’sTaken October 1914 (unrelated to my family)

    Images of Philadelphia from Early 1900’s

    Taken October 1914 (unrelated to my family)

  11. Aug 3, 1920

    Two months before his death, Joseph McGinn (and his partner Comdeco) testified in the Captain McCoach corruption case. McGinn and Comdeco provided testimony that confirmed ”dope pedaling” and “vice” were out of control in McCoach’s district. 

  12. Joseph McGinn was an investigator on this case.

    Joseph McGinn was an investigator on this case.

  13. Joseph McGinn was an investigator on this case.

    Joseph McGinn was an investigator on this case.

  14. Joseph McGinn was an investigator on this case.

    Joseph McGinn was an investigator on this case.

  15. Philadelphia’s 2nd District. Joseph McGinn was a beat cop and a detective in this district his entire career (except for the 6-9 months he spent in the 42nd District in late 1918-1919).

    Philadelphia’s 2nd District. Joseph McGinn was a beat cop and a detective in this district his entire career (except for the 6-9 months he spent in the 42nd District in late 1918-1919).

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The McGinn Project

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